I’ve told you before how my son is hoping to be an architect when he grows up. From what I’ve been told it’s a difficult career to get started in and the collegiate program is both difficult to enroll in and challenging to say the least. But, I’m a firm believer in the “If you put your mind to it, you can accomplish anything.” mentality. 
100 Architectural Engineering Resources for Smart Kids | GreatPeaceAcademy.com #ihsnet

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He’s certainly set his mind to it, as he hasn’t wavered from this particular desire for many years now. So as he heads into his high school years next year I want to ensure he’s been given a good  architectural engineering foundation, pun intended, as possible. Which is going to mean lots of math, science and physics. Which just happen to be his favorites. 

I’m pulling together a listing of resources not only so I’ll have a handy place to come back to time and again, but so that you too will be able to find learning resources for engineering minded kids. 

Must Have Architectural Engineering Books – 8

 


 

Architectural Websites for Kids to Explore

  1. Arch for Kids
  2. Architecture is Fun
  3. ArKIDecture
  4. CUBE – Center for Understanding the Built Environment
  5. KidSearch – Wiki – Architecture
  6. Kids Think Design – Architecture
  7. Science & Kids – Structure Images

10 Architects to Study

Free Cad and Drawing Programs

  1. 3D Slash App – A free PC download, but you do need to register.
    3D Slash Web Version – Free use, but there are more limitations due to web browser functionality than the app.
  2. 3D Tin –  Afree use, web based program, all you need is Google Chrome or Firefox with WebGL support
  3. Blender –  A free open source, 3D creation software.
  4. FreeCAD – an open source, customizable, parametric 3D modeler.
  5. Gimp – (Gnu Image Manipulation Program) a free software downloadable open source image editor.
  6. Inkscape – a free downloadable vector graphics editor.
  7. Kerkythea – a freeware software that allows you to produce 
  8. Sketchboard – free download, sketch oriented cad program.
  9. SketchUp – Choose SketchUp Make for Educational Purposes, a free download.
  10. TinkerCad – a free online browser based 3D Design and modeling tool.

Architectural Engineering Building Toys & Games

I’m a firm believer in learning through play. I think the more hands on a person can be the more they’ll learn how to use, create and adapt. Through play children learn to not be afraid to try new things. They aren’t afraid of failure when the goal is fun. As such, I offer you these options to introduce your children to concepts in architecture as well as some options for older kids to explore in a hands on way.

For Kids
 


For Teens

 


Curriculum & Activities for Architectural Engineering

100 Architectural Engineering Resources for Smart Kids | GreatPeaceAcademy.com #ihsnet

  1. American Institute of Architects – Triangle, Architects in the Classroom
  2. ArKIDecture Lessons for Kids
  3. Architecture & Structures – Pitsco Education
  4. Architecture! It’s Elementary Lesson Plans
  5. Building Architectural Models
  6. Discovery Kids – Amazing Skyscrapers
  7. Frank Lloyd Wright Education
  8. FUPA Architecture Games
  9. Earthquake-Proof Engineering for Skyscrapers
  10. Learn 4 Good – Building Games & Construction Simulation Games
  11. PBS Building Big 
  12. Squaring the Circle: Geometry in Art and Architecture (Mathematics Across the Curriculum)
  13. Teach Children Well – Architecture
  14. Castle Lesson Plans (Blick Art)

Architectural Engineering Videos

 

  1. A Master Architect asks, Now What?
  2. Ancient Roman Architecture
  3. Architecture Size Comparison, 3D
  4. Building Foam Board Models
  5. Citibloks Construction
  6. DIY Cardboard House
  7. Popsicle Stick Mansion
  8. Gothic Architecture
  9. How to Build a Wooden Model House
  10. Introduction to Greek Architecture
  11. Keva Plank Construction
  12. Modern Architectural Building
  13. Paper House
  14. Pyramids
  15. Skyhouse, An Architect’s Version
  16. Why Buildings of the Future will be Shaped by You
  17. Sketches of Frank Gehry
  18. Great Minds of Design
  19. Most Famous Buildings in the World
  20. Tallest Building Concept Never Built

Architectural Engineering Drawing Supplies

Of course the best way to build skill is through practice. Letting a child explore their interests can’t get more simple than giving them the tools needed and then getting out of their way to let them explore their ideas. With pencil and paper a simple sketch can grow to a model which just might become the next most beautiful structure the world has ever seen.




 


I’ll be the first to admit that I personally don’t know a lot about architecture. I’m learning as I watch my son with fascination. I’ve developed a love for the beauty that exists in the geometric and design aspects of buildings. But, I can’t for the life of me imagine how one goes from a mental concept to the incredible structures that are works of art. But, I also realize, it’s not for me to know and understand those things. It’s for those who have the kind of visionary minds to see beyond the page to what can become reality. 

Do you have a child who sees structures forming in his/her head, then draws it with a few short geometric patterns? How do you help them to foster their interests? 

Renée at Great Peace Academy

 

 

 

I’m joining this post with the iHomeschool Network 100 Things post.

100-things

 

 

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100+ Architectural Engineering Resources for Smart Kids
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14 thoughts on “100+ Architectural Engineering Resources for Smart Kids

  • November 21, 2016 at 2:24 pm
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    I have four, but older two have graduated. My son is a freshman in high school and enjoys life science, but has not interest in other science. I also have a 9 year old daughter who loves all things science. She enjoys looking at things under the microscope, doing chemistry experiments, and playing with her snap circuits. She is my science kid.

    Reply
    • November 21, 2016 at 2:57 pm
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      Isn’t it so interesting how different kids are. I love how your son is interested in life science but not other sciences. That shows his unique individuality compared to your daughter who likes all things science.

      Reply
  • November 21, 2016 at 9:12 pm
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    I just have one boy so far. He is a little young for these books, but I have 4 brothers and 3 are engineers so this is right up their alley!

    Reply
    • November 21, 2016 at 9:41 pm
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      Yes! This was written more for later elementary through middle school. But it’s never too early to start inspiring… 😉
      How fun to have a family of engineers. Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
  • November 22, 2016 at 5:41 am
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    I don’t have any kids yet other than fur babies, but we are actively trying!

    Reply
  • November 22, 2016 at 9:14 pm
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    I have a 9yo, a 4yo, and a 1yo! Great things here. Just a heads up some of the Amazon ads must not be showing up because I don’t see all of the books listed (just an empty space)! I’d love to see which ones you selected! I’ll definitely forward this list to the parents of the kids in my STEM co-op class!

    Reply
    • November 22, 2016 at 11:19 pm
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      Oh no!
      Are you by chance on mobile? I’ll go back and add in text links as well. Bummer! Thanks for the heads up.

      Reply
  • November 22, 2016 at 10:14 pm
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    I have two kids. My daughter is 16, and my son is 6. They are the loves of my life!

    Reply
    • November 22, 2016 at 11:18 pm
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      That’s awesome! Yes our kids do become our loves don’t they? It’s incredible really the bond that exists.

      Reply
  • November 24, 2016 at 12:13 am
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    I have 9 kids ranging in age from 1 up to 16.

    Reply
  • November 25, 2016 at 9:38 pm
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    I have several nieces and nephews but no children of my own yet. My nieces and nephews range from age 6 to 16.

    Reply
  • November 27, 2016 at 10:22 pm
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    We have three children; ages 23, 19, and 11. My youngest two love everything science!

    Reply

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